‘We need to bring the party together’: Yang endorses Biden, calls for Democratic unity against Trump

William Cummings | USA TODAY

Former 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang endorsed former Vice President Joe Biden Tuesday night and called for Democrats to unite behind Biden ahead of the general election. 

Yang, now a CNN contributor, made his endorsement on live TV as the results from six more primary contests showed Biden widening his delegate lead over Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont. 

“I believe that Joe Biden will be the Democratic nominee, and I’ve always said I’m going to support whoever the nominee is. So I hereby am endorsing Joe Biden to be not just the nominee for the Democratic Party, but the next president of the United States,” Yang declared. 

Yang, who supported Sanders in 2016, called the self-described democratic socialist “an inspiration,” but said the delegate math made it clear that he was not going to win the Democratic presidential primary race. And he said it was time for Democrats to focus on their main objective. 

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1 African, 2 Latin American countries elect more women parliamentarians

AM Buita | March 7, 2020

In the world where women are still struggling for equality, three countries went out and voted more women than men at least in terms of legislation. According to the Inter-Parliamentary Union, women occupy 61.25% and 53.08% of the parliamentary seats in the lower chambers of Rwanda and Bolivia, respectively, and 53.22% in the single-chamber legislative branch of Cuba.

United Arab Emirates ranked four as voters awarded to women half of the seats in the single-chamber parliament .

Others that made it to top ten in terms of the percentage of women members in the parliament are Mexico with 48.2%, Nicaragua with 47.25%, Sweden with 46.99%, Grenada with 46.67%, Andorra with 46.43% and South Africa with 46.35%.

Continue reading “1 African, 2 Latin American countries elect more women parliamentarians”

Elizabeth Warren, Once a Front-Runner, Drops Out of Presidential Race

By Shane Goldmacher and Astead W. Herndon | NYTimes.Com | March 5, 2020

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — Senator Elizabeth Warren entered the 2020 race with expansive plans to use the federal government to remake American society, pressing to strip power and wealth from a moneyed class that she saw as fundamentally corrupting the country’s economic and political order.

She exited on Thursday after her avalanche of progressive policy proposals, which briefly elevated her to front-runner status last fall, failed to attract a broader political coalition in a Democratic Party increasingly, if not singularly, focused on defeating President Trump.

Her departure means that a Democratic field that began as the most diverse in American history — and included six women — is now essentially down to two white men: former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and Senator Bernie Sanders.

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Michael Bloomberg Ends Presidential Bid, Endorses Joe Biden

By  | Bloomberg.com

Michael Bloomberg endorsed Joe Biden for the Democratic nomination as he ended his presidential campaign on Wednesday and pledged to continue working to defeat President Donald Trump.

Bloomberg said in a New York speech that after the results of the Super Tuesday voting, he no longer had a viable path to the nomination and didn’t want to hurt the party’s chances.

He had spent a record $687 million of his own money on the effort, but Biden dominated the Super Tuesday vote, winning 10 states of 14. Bloomberg earned at least 53 delegates, compared to at least 566 for Biden.

“I entered the race for president to defeat Donald Trump,” Bloomberg said. “And today, I am leaving the race for the same reason – to defeat Donald Trump, because staying in would make it more difficult to achieve that goal.”

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Biden keeps distance from Sanders in Super Tuesday

AM Buita | March 5, 2020 | 11:00 PM GMT

Joe Biden is seen garnering more delegates and keeping his distance from Bernie Sanders based on the latest count of the Super Tuesday votes.

With 9 states completely counted out of the 15 that voted last Tuesday, March 3, completely counted and only 152 delegates to be awarded, Biden kept his distance from the rest of the Democrat aspirants maintaining a lead with 82 delegates on his side.

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Democrats should be wary of backing Joe Biden and his ‘senior moments’: Devine

Miranda Devine | NYPost.com

What Super Tuesday tells us is that a lot of Democrats would rather risk losing to President Trump with Joe Biden than allow a socialist like Bernie Sanders to hijack their party.

That’s good for America, but it’s also a treacherous Hail Mary pass for the party.

The 77-year-old former vice president showed why, moments after taking the stage in Los Angeles on Tuesday night: He mistook his wife for his sister.

“They switched on me,” he tried to explain.

He went on to give a good speech about healing the nation, and dutifully kept to the script on his teleprompter.

But then a protester leaped on stage and Biden’s wife, Jill, 68, instinctively stepped between him and the lunging vegan, grabbed the woman by the wrists and shoved her away.

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Biden and Sanders — neck and neck in Super Tuesday

With 284 delegates still to be awarded, the battle for Democrat nominee is a neck and neck battle between Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders.

Latest results show that Biden secured 512 delegates, Sanders has 441; Michael Bloomberg and Elizabeth Warren got 53 each; and, Tulsi Gabbard got 1.

Biden also led the aspirants in 10 states while Sanders led in four. How the States voted, check the table below.

StateNumber of DelegatesPercent CountedJoseph Biden, Jr. Bernard Sanders Michael Bloomberg Elizabeth Warren Tulsi Gabbard 
Alabama52100.00%63.20%16.60%11.70%5.70%0.20%
Arkansas31100.00%40.50%22.40%16.70%10.00%0.70%
California41589.90%23.70%32.70%15.10%12.10%0.70%
Colorado6779.40%23.20%36.20%20.90%17.20%1.10%
Maine2498.30%33.90%33.10%11.90%16.00%0.90%
Massachusetts9199.90%33.70%26.60%11.70%21.20%0.80%
Minnesotta75100.00%38.60%29.90%8.30%15.40%0.30%
North Carolina110100.00%43.00%24.10%13.00%10.50%0.50%
Oklahoma37100.00%38.70%25.40%13.90%13.40%1.70%
Tennessee64100.00%41.70%25.00%15.50%10.40%0.40%
Texas228100.00%34.50%30.00%14.40%11.40%0.40%
Utah2974.30%17.40%34.60%16.70%15.50%0.80%
Vermont16100.00%22.00%50.70%9.40%12.60%0.80%
Virginia99100.00%53.30%23.10%9.80%10.80%0.90%

Explainer: Presidential Candidates in Bolivia’s 2020 Special Elections

Paola Nagovitch | AS/COA

Jeanine Áñez. (AP)

Updated February 25, 2020—Bolivia’s October 20 elections need no introduction. The Andean country held the news spotlight as a result of the controversial presidential election in which incumbent Evo Morales emerged as the winner after a nearly 24-hour vote count freeze. Amid concerns of election fraud, protests broke out across the country. After a preliminary Organization of American States (OAS) election audit found evidence of voting irregularities and manipulation, Morales and Vice President Álvaro García Linera stepped down on November 10 after the head of Bolivia’s military called for their resignation. 

As Morales zigzagged across Latin America to reach asylum in Mexico, then-vice president of the Senate and opposition leader Jeanine Áñezoriginally fifth in the line of succession— declared herself interim president in the wake of several resignations, a move Bolivia’s Constitutional Court later affirmed. After the country’s legislature passed a law annulling the October results, a date for special do-over elections was set for May 3. A runoff is scheduled for June 14 if no candidate wins at least 50 percent of the vote or secures at least 40 percent with a 10-point margin over the closest competitor. Election proceedings will be monitored by the OAS, the European Union, and the United Nations. 

Bolivians will elect a president, vice president, and all the members of the legislative assembly—36 senators and 130 deputies. There are eight presidential candidates, four running on coalition tickets and four with individual parties. The winning ticket will serve for the 2020–2025 term. Voting is compulsory in Bolivia, and voter turnout hit nearly 90 percent in the October election with over 5.8 million people casting ballots.

Candidates were required to register by February 3. AS/COA Online profiles the candidates.

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Three former rivals endorse Biden for president on Super Tuesday Eve

Who’s Running for President in 2020?

By Alexander BurnsMatt FlegenheimerJasmine C. LeeLisa Lerer and Jonathan Martin | The New York Times | Updated March 2, 2020

5 Democrats 2 RepublicansBidenBloombergGabbardSandersWarrenTrumpWeldDropped Out23 Democrats 2 RepublicansKlobucharButtigiegSteyerPatrickYangBennetDelaneyBookerWilliamsonCastroHarrisBullockSestakMessamO’RourkeRyande BlasioGillibrandMoultonInsleeHickenlooperSwalwellOjedaWalshSanford

The field of Democratic presidential candidates was historically large, but many have now dropped out.

There are currently five people running for the 2020 Democratic nomination. President Trump picked up a couple of Republican challengers — all but one have ended their campaigns. Below, an accounting of who’s still in and who’s out.

RunningJoseph R. Biden Jr., 77Former vice president; former senator from DelawareDemocrat“If we give Donald Trump eight years in the White House, he will forever and fundamentally alter the character of this nation, who we are, and I cannot stand by and watch that happen.”

Has run for president twice before.

Is known for his down-to-earth personality and his ability to connect with working-class voters.

Regards 2020 as his last chance to run for president.

SIGNATURE ISSUES: Restoring America’s standing on the global stage; strengthening economic protections for low-income workers in industries like manufacturing and fast food.

Check out Joe Biden’s candidate profile page »Michael R. Bloomberg, 78Billionaire media executive; former mayor of New York CityDemocrat“Defeating Donald Trump — and rebuilding America — is the most urgent and important fight of our lives. And I’m going all in.”

Recently reversed his longstanding support of the aggressive “stop-and-frisk” policing strategy that he pursued for a decade while he was mayor.

Has flirted with mounting a bid for president for more than a decade.

Re-registered as a Democrat in October 2018, nearly two decades after he left the party to run for mayor as a Republican.

Has voiced stark disagreements with progressives on issues including bank regulation, stop-and-frisk police tactics and the #MeToo movement.

SIGNATURE ISSUES: Has been an outspoken voice on gun control and climate change, but his views on taxes would put him on the conservative end of the Democratic field.

Check out Michael Bloomberg’s candidate profile page »

Tulsi Gabbard, 38Congresswoman from Hawaii; Army National Guard veteranDemocrat“There are a lot of challenges that are facing the American people that I’m concerned about and that I want to help solve.”

Supported Bernie Sanders in the 2016 primaries.

Has drawn condemnation for meeting with Syria’s president, Bashar al-Assad, whose regime has been accused of using chemical weapons against civilians.

Has apologized for her history of anti-gay statements and her past work for an anti-gay advocacy group.

SIGNATURE ISSUE: Opposition to American military intervention overseas, including in countries like Syria.

Check out Tulsi Gabbard’s candidate profile page »Bernie Sanders, 78Senator from Vermont; former congressmanDemocrat“The only way we will win this election and create a government and economy that work for all is with a grassroots movement — the likes of which has never been seen in American history.”

A self-described democratic socialist, has brought progressive proposals like Medicare for All and tuition-free public college to the forefront of the race.

Was the runner-up in the 2016 Democratic primary.

SIGNATURE ISSUES: “Medicare for all,” free college tuition and curtailing the influence of “the billionaires.”

Check out Bernie Sanders’s candidate profile page »Elizabeth Warren, 70Senator from Massachusetts; former Harvard professorDemocrat“It’s time for women to go to Washington and fix our broken government, and that includes a woman at the top.”

Speaks frequently about the need for “big, structural change.”

Has released a wide range of detailed plans that together have the potential to reshape the economy.

“I have a plan for that” has become her rallying cry and a T-shirt slogan.

SIGNATURE ISSUES: Income inequality and what she sees as a middle class under attack from big corporations and political corruption.

Check out Elizabeth Warren’s candidate profile page »Donald J. Trump, 73U.S. president; real estate developer; reality television starRepublican“Considering that we have done more than any administration in the first two years, this should be easy. More great things now in the works!”

Main legislative accomplishment as president: a sweeping tax cut that chiefly benefited corporations and wealthy investors.

Has focused on undoing the policies of the Obama administration, including on health careenvironmental regulation and immigration.

Faces multiple serious legal investigations, though the recent report by Robert S. Mueller III, the special counsel, found no evidence he coordinated with Russia’s 2016 election interference.

SIGNATURE ISSUES: Restricting immigration and building a wall at the Mexican border; renegotiating or canceling international deals on trade, arms control and climate change; withdrawing American troops from overseas.

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