Tag: featured

Kamala Harris is Joe Biden’s running mate

Presidential candidate, Joe Biden of the Democratic Party, chose the California senator of Indian-Jamaican heritage, Kamala Harris, as his running mate in the 2020 United States presidential election.

Biden describes Harris as “a fearless fighter for the little guy, and one of the country’s finest public servants”. In a tweet, Biden claimed that Harris, who worked with his late son, Beau, his son, Beau, ” took on the big banks, lifted up working people, and protected women and kids from abuse.”

Photo credit: Democrats.org
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It’s China and Iran vs Russia in US Elections

The United States 2020 elections is becoming more divisive as countries started to align with Presidential candidates. According to US intelligence community officials, China and Iran are working against re-electionist President Donald Trump while Russia is working against the election of Democrat Presidential candidate Joe Biden.

The claim is being confirmed by National Counterintelligence and Security Center Director William Evanina who said that “Many foreign actors have a preference for who wins the election, which they express through a range of overt and private statements; covert influence efforts are rarer.”

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Biden builds lead as Trump goes from trailing to flailing

By DAVID SIDERS | Politico.Com | 07/04/2020

As recently as one month ago, Donald Trump was merely losing. Now he is flailing, trudging into the Independence Day weekend at the nadir of his presidency, trailing by double digits in recent polls and in danger of dragging the Republican Senate down with him.

But there are still four months before the election — and any number of ways for Biden to blow it.

US Presidential aspirant, Joe Biden. (Source: Politico.com)

Even the best campaigns “can get f—– up,” said Kelly Dietrich, founder of the National Democratic Training Committee, which trains candidates across the country. “There are a million ways to lose.”

Dietrich, like even the most circumspect observers of the 2020 campaign, does not predict that Biden will fall apart. But Democrats carry checklists in their minds of the universe of things that could alter the course of the campaign.

Biden might say the wrong thing at a debate, or have an awkward moment in an interview or at a press conference. Trump’s massive advertising campaign might begin to resonate, hurting Biden’s favorability ratings. Biden’s campaign might make poor decisions about spending allocations in the battleground states, or the coverage of his campaign may sour if he loses even a percentage point or two in polls. Presidential candidates with large leads have all suffered from less.

And then there are the factors outside of Biden’s control. It is possible that Trump before November will announce a coronavirus vaccine, whether real or imagined. And it is possible that the economy will improve, a prospect Republicans are pinning their hopes to.

So much has changed over such a short period of time — so far, much of it to Biden’s advantage — that it’s impossible to rule out any kind of black swan political event.

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View from Japan: South Korea’s Pandemic Elections

By Tadashi Kimiya | The Diplomat

In elections held in South Korea last week, the ruling liberal Democratic Party and its satellite Citizen Party won 180 seats of the 300 seats in the National Assembly. The conservative opposition United Future Party and its satellite Future Korea Party were meanwhile left with just 103 seats.

Credit: (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

The resounding win frees the government from the limitations of the National Assembly Advancement Act, so that it is now able to legislate anything other than constitutional amendments. This was a historic election, even more so when taking into consideration that it took place under the extraordinary circumstances of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Some observers have argued that South Korean politics might be transitioning from a conservative/liberal two-party system to a liberal-predominant party system, like the conservative LDP-predominant party system that existed in Japan during the Cold War. However, if we look at voter turnout for candidates in single-seat constituencies, it was 49.9 percent for the liberal ruling party and 41.5 percent for the conservative opposition party, hardly a crushing difference. Moreover, in proportional representation constituencies, the other conservative opposition party actually finished first with 33.8 percent, leading the other liberal with 33.4 percent, a low figure even when accounting for the split in the liberal group.

Given these numbers, it is premature to conclude that we are at the start of an era dominated by a single party. Indeed, it is worth remembering that conservative votes accounted for more than 60 percent of the results in the 2007 presidential election 13 years ago, giving the conservatives a landslide win over their liberal opponents, despite a split between the conservative candidates, and bringing about a change of government.

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Democracy wins over Covid-19 pandemic

Even the Coronavirus disease (Covid)-19 has no match for the South Korean voters when they turned out to vote for the members of their National Assembly. 66.21% of the 43.99 million voters went out to cast their votes despite the ongoing pandemic — the highest turnout since 1992.

The National Assembly elections in the country is a combination of first-past-the-post elections for the 253 constituencies and proportional party list system for the 47 members of the parliament. The liberal Democratic Party bagged 163 of the seats while its satellite party, the Together Citizen’s Party, won 17 seats. Together they occupy 180 or 60% of the 300 National Assembly seats.

Meanwhile, the conservatives made their worst performance since 1960 with the United Future Party and its satellite Future Korea Party gaining only 103 seats.

With the election results, the liberals are seen to have the freehand to legislate anything other than constitutional amendments. Being a mid-term elections, the results also reaffirm the leadership of South Korean President, Moon Jae-In.

Allocation of seats in the new electoral system
Red: 253 constituency seats under first-past-the-post
Blue: 30 proportional seats under the compensatory additional member system
Green: 17 proportional seats under the parallel voting system
Source: King Wither

Biden keeps distance from Sanders in Super Tuesday

AM Buita | March 5, 2020 | 11:00 PM GMT

Joe Biden is seen garnering more delegates and keeping his distance from Bernie Sanders based on the latest count of the Super Tuesday votes.

With 9 states completely counted out of the 15 that voted last Tuesday, March 3, completely counted and only 152 delegates to be awarded, Biden kept his distance from the rest of the Democrat aspirants maintaining a lead with 82 delegates on his side.

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Taiwan Elections: Young candidates, underdogs prevail in several legislative races

FocusTaiwan.tw

From left to right Kao Chia-yu, Lai Pin-yu and Chen Po-wei

Taipei, Jan. 12 (CNA) Taiwan’s legislative elections saw several young politicians prevail in high-profile races, and some candidates claimed victory independent of the country’s political mainstream dominated by the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) and Kuomintang (KMT).

Of the 113 seats available, the DPP won 61, followed by the KMT with 38, the Taiwan People’s Party (TPP) with five, the New Power Party (NPP) with three, and the remaining six seats divided between independents and a small pro-independence party.

In the 79 races in which candidates were directly elected rather than through a party vote for legislators-at-large, 14 new faces emerged.

In one of the night’s more closely-watched races, in New Taipei City’s rural 12th District, 27-year-old DPP candidate Lai Pin-yu (賴品妤) narrowly edged out her KMT opponent in a field of three.

Lai, a former student activist and cosplay enthusiast, entered the race in September, after the district’s incumbent, the NPP’s Huang Kuo-chang (黃國昌), announced he would run on his party’s legislator at-large list, leaving a lesser-known NPP candidate to try and defend the seat.

Meanwhile, in Taipei City’s 4th District, 39-year-old DPP city councilor Kao Chia-yu (高嘉瑜) upset KMT incumbent Lee Yen-hsiu (李彥秀) by a 50-47 percent margin.

In doing so, Kao leveraged a national profile built through her frequent appearances on political talk shows to overcome Lee’s deep family connections to the district, which was previously represented by her father and grandfather.

However, in a battle between two rising political stars in Taipei’s 3rd District (Zhongshan and Songshan districts), KMT incumbent Chiang Wan-an (蔣萬安) was able to hold his seat against DPP challenger Enoch Wu (吳怡農).

Chiang Wan-an
Chiang Wan-an

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Taiwan election: Tsai Ing-wen wins second presidential term, beating Beijing- friendly rival

Pei-ju Teng | Hong Kong Free Press

Taiwan’s incumbent leader Tsai Ing-wen has won Saturday’s presidential election, defeating her Beijing-friendly rival Han Kuo-yu by a wide margin.

Tsai Ing-wen

Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen greets supporters after winning the presidential election on January 11, 2020. Photo: Sam Yeh/AFP

“Taiwan is showing the world how much we cherish our free and democratic way of life,” Tsai told supporters at 9pm as she confirmed her victory.

Taiwan election January 10 Democratic Progressive Party DPP Tsai Ing-wen

DPP supporters rally in Taipei on January 11. Photo: KM/United Social Press.

A jubilant crowd of supporters outside the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) headquarters in Taipei burst into cheers as Tsai appeared on stage to address reporters.

Taiwan election January 10 Democratic Progressive Party DPP Tsai Ing-wen

Democratic Progressive Party supporters rally in Taipei on January 10, election day. Photo: Viola Kam/United Social Press.

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From social media to cosplay: How Taiwan politicians are reaching out to voters

By J. A. Carizo*

It’s not just the economy, stupid!

Well, not in these times, James Carville. In the 2016 elections, Donald Trump benefited heavily from the social media interactions leading to his election as President of the United States. According to Pew Research Center, 44% of the Americans get their information on, and even interact with, the candidates through the social media. In the Philippines, Rodrigo Duterte also used heavily the Facebook to connect with the voters and won the highly contested presidential race. So did other candidates in different elections all across the globe that the social media platforms became suspect of spreading false information and fake news.

The ease of using the social media platform and the speed of reaching out to target voters is indeed enticing that Taiwan’s presidential hopefuls turned to Facebook and YouTube to ramp up their campaign and reach out to the younger segment of the electorate. According to Taiwan’s electoral commission, the country has over 19 million voters and under 7 million of them are between the ages of 20 and 39. This segment of voters usually exhibit low turnout during elections and reaching out to them could bring closer to victory.

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Milanović defeats Grabar-Kitarović in Croatia’s Presidential elections

Opinion polls suggested Milanovic would win the largely ceremonial post, though by a smaller margin [Marko Djurica/Reuters]

Social Democrat candidate Zoran Milanović emerged as the winner in the recently concluded presidential elections in Croatia beating incumbent president Kolinda Grabar-Kitarovic of the governing Croatian Democratic Union (HDZ) party. Milanović generated 52.7% of the vote according to results released late Sunday, January 5, as against Grabar-Kitarovic who garnered only 47.3% in the second round of the elections.

Eleven candidates initially competed during the first round of the elections held last December 22, 2019. The incumbent president only got garnered 26.65% while former Prime Minister Milanović got 29.55%. For failing to reach a majority, a second round of voting became necessary.

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